April 6-122015
2015 coverage by The Augusta Chronicle
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Masters hole 16

No. 16 Redbud

Par 3 170 yards

This par-3 requires anything from a short- to medium-iron shot. The green is the holes main defense; being below the hole is a must. The back bunker and a pond on the left also pose hazards.

1934 yardage

145, par 3

 

360 degree view: no. 16

 

About the plant

  • Deciduous flowering tree 
  • Blooms March to May; clusters of small orchid-pink blooms before new heart-shaped leaves appear; followed by long seed pods 
  • Called Judas tree based on myth that Judas Iscariot hanged himself on the related Cercis siliquastrum 

Spot it on the course

  • It grows behind the 16th tee, left of the pond and right of the fairway cut. 

Where and how the plant grows

  • Native to Eastern U.S. 
  • Grows 20 to 30 feet high and 15 to 25 feet wide 
  • Full sun to shade (in Southern zones) 
  • Moist, well-drained, fertile soil 
  • High drought tolerance 
  • Propagation by seed

How players fared

Next grouping
Significant changes since opening
  • Stream in front of green transformed into a pond, 1947
R1 R2 R3 R4
Historical average:
Historical rank:
Pins 1

about the course

Landmark of American golf

Welcome to the Augusta National Golf Club clubhouse, a structure that was built in 1854 to serve as the home of indigo plantation owner Dennis Redmond.

Second hole favors birdies

No. 2, known as Pink Dogwood, is the longest hole at Augusta National, but a downhill slope and simple lay-up opportunities make it play easier.

No. 8 makes for long walk

Although No. 8 plays as one of the longest holes at Augusta National Golf Club, wedge consistency might be the key to coming away with a good score.

13 known for beauty, drama

The 13th hole at Augusta National features about 1,600 azaleas and is shortest par-5 on the course.

No. 15 home of famous shots

The 15th hole, known as Firethorn, is home to one of the most famous approach shots on the course, and perhaps the most well-known shot in Masters history.

17th tee more inviting

Without Ike's Tree, players are finding the fairway at a strong rate. The challenge is to follow it with a good second shot.

Ike's Tree: One Year Later

It's been one year since the Eisenhower Tree was taken down, and Augusta National Golf Club has no plans to replace the landmark anytime soon.

Front nine not always toughest

The front nine was the place to make a move Saturday at Augusta National Golf Club.

Design

Bobby Jones on the design of Augusta National

Bobby Jones

1. "Dr. Mackenzie and I believe that no good golf hole exists that does not afford a proper and convenient solution to the average golfer and the short player, as well as to the more powerful and accurate expert."

2. "We have always felt that the make-or-break character of many of the holes of our second nine has been largely responsible for rewarding our spectators with so many dramatic finishes. It has always been a nine that could be played in the low thirties or the middle forties."

Bobby Jones Quotes: video | photos

Alister Mackenzie on the design of Augusta National

Allister Mackenzie

1. "There should be little walking between the greens and tees, and the course should be arranged so that in the first instance there is always a slight walk forwards from the green to the next tee; then the holes are sufficiently elastic to be lengthened in the future if necessary."

2. "There should be a minimum of blindness for the approach shots."

3. "There should be a sufficient number of heroic carries from the tee, but the course should be arranged so that the weaker player with the loss of a stroke or portion of a stroke shall always have an alternative route open to him."

Two of one mind in regard to National

In July 1931, banner headlines in newspapers across the country trumpeted the news: Bobby Jones was building a course in Augusta, and Alister MacKenzie would be the primary architect.

Reversal of fortune

The groundwork for Gene Sarazen's double eagle at the 1935 Masters - and all of the memorable shots and drama that have followed - was laid by Bobby Jones and tournament co-founder Clifford Roberts a few months earlier. They reversed the nines.

walking tour

Augusta Chronicle sports editor John Boyette takes you on a tour of Augusta National Golf Club.

Fans' Guide

Though Augusta National is steeped in tradition, change on the golf course has always been part of the plan. Take a tour of the Masters course at Augusta National to see what's new!

Par-3 Perfection

The Par-3 Contest is held on the Wednesday before the Masters Tournament, and participation is optional. Players often invite their children, spouses or celebrities to be their caddies for a day.   Read more

 

360 view: par-3 course, ike's pond

2015 par-3 photos